[Smlr_net] [IWS] CECC: [CHINA] ANNUAL REPORT 2009 (Human Rights) [16 October 2009]]

Eugene McElroy sagauro at rci.rutgers.edu
Thu Oct 22 09:19:01 EDT 2009


CONGRESSIONAL-EXECUTIVE COMMISSION ON CHINA

[CHINA] ANNUAL REPORT 2009 [16 October 2009]
http://www.cecc.gov/pages/annualRpt/annualRpt09/CECCannRpt2009.pdf
[full-text, 448 pages]

[excerpt]
This report documents, in each of its sections, the challenges and
opportunities that exist for China to create a more open society
with greater respect for human rights, transparency, and the rule
of law. The report also demonstrates the importance of the Commission’s
Political Prisoner Database, a unique, powerful, and publicly
available resource on which the Commission relies for advocacy
and research work, including the preparation of this Annual
Report. The human rights issues underlying political imprisonment
and detention are numerous. Instances of human rights violations
and resulting imprisonment form a pattern of systematic repression—
the Chinese Government should demonstrate its commitment
to international standards by reversing this pattern.

The Commission intends that the detailed contents of this report
may serve as a roadmap for progress. By documenting human
rights violations in this report and in the Commission’s Political
Prisoner Database, by advocating in meetings with Chinese officials
on behalf of political prisoners, by raising public awareness of
human rights and rule of law issues, and by placing these issues
on the agendas of bilateral and multilateral meetings, the United
States Government establishes a baseline for measuring progress.
Some of those who supported establishing permanent normal trade
relations (PNTR) with China in 2000 believed that PNTR would
improve the prospects that the Chinese Government would fulfill
its commitments to international human rights standards—but the
Chinese Government has yet to live up to those commitments.
Holding the Chinese Government accountable to its international
commitments and to its own laws, when those laws meet international
standards, is an essential element of the roadmap for
progress.


CO N T E N T S
Preface
......................................................................................................................
1
General Overview
....................................................................................................
3
I. Executive Summary and Recommendations
...................................................... 8
Findings and Recommendations
...................................................................... 8
Political Prisoner Database
.............................................................................
40
II. Human Rights
.....................................................................................................
44
Freedom of Expression
.....................................................................................
44
Worker Rights
...................................................................................................
68
Criminal Justice
...............................................................................................
88
Freedom of Religion
..........................................................................................
110
Ethnic Minority Rights
....................................................................................
144
Population Planning
.........................................................................................
151
Freedom of Residence
.......................................................................................
161
Status of Women
..............................................................................................
165
Human Trafficking
...........................................................................................
172
North Korean Refugees in China
.................................................................... 177
Public Health
....................................................................................................
181
Climate Change and Environment
................................................................. 190
III. Development of the Rule of Law
...................................................................... 203
Civil Society
......................................................................................................
203
Institutions of Democratic Governance
.......................................................... 208
Commercial Rule of Law
..................................................................................
217
Access to Justice
...............................................................................................
232
IV. Xinjiang
..............................................................................................................
243
V. Tibet
.....................................................................................................................
270
VI. Developments in Hong Kong and Macau
........................................................ 300
VII. Endnotes
...........................................................................................................
310

______________________________
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****************************************
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****************************************

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Eugene McElroy
Rutgers University
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