[16days_discussion] 16 Days COUNTDOWN- issue 4

Amanda Stevens Amanda.Stevens at odh.ohio.gov
Wed Nov 21 13:06:23 EST 2007


Hello all! Below are my responses to both sets of discussion questions (sorry for the delay!)
 
Thanks,
 
Amanda Stevens
 

- What are the myths and stereotypes that continue to exist around the use and acceptance of violence against women in your community?

 

In my community, there is still a lot of victim blaming in situations of violence against women. There is also a lot of ignoring the problem, not naming incidents as part of a larger problem of violence against women. 

 

-What steps need to be taken and by who in order to shift these stereotypes?

 

The traditional education methods aren't working. We need to outreach to different parts of the community and ask them what they think about violence against women, and really listen to the answers...a lot of dialog needs to happen to identify what the community's values are before we can move forward.

 

-Are there men-led organizations in your country that campaign against the use of violence by men against women? Have you ever partnered with these organizations?

 

There are men-led organizations that campaign against this violence here in the US, and we have partnered with them to share information, curriculum ideas, and as speakers at professional education events.

 

-What message can men in your community carry to other men?

 

That violence against women is everyone's business. Mostly, the men I see think violence against women is wrong, but they see it as an individual, personal problem, not a public health or community issue. Men are also afraid to start looking at this issue because they are afraid of what they will find, among their friends and inside themselves.

 

- Based on your work and experience what are the best tools/methods that can be used to raise awareness?

 

Hooking people with information/resources that want or need is a good way to start a conversation. It is also helpful to use personal stories that appeal to people's natural sense of empathy with others. As much as possible, awareness efforts should be positive in nature- no one wants to be attacked or made to feel guilty, but if we can help people feel like they are part of the solution, it will open the door for more assertive action.

 

-Do most women in your community know where to go to receive services and protection is they are threatened or become a victim of violence?

 

I imagine that many women here would know of a place to call, but not all- hotline and shelter services in our state are struggling due to lack of funds.

 

- What can be done better to ensure that women know their rights and can access the protections and services they need when faced with violence

 

More resources need to be invested in intervention services. Staff should be paid well and facilities should have the funds to address the need in their service area. Everyone should have a skilled provider in their area. Violence against women services should be considered an important, available health resource along with mental health, substance abuse counseling, primary care, etc.

 

- Do you think that it is possible to measure the impact of the work
done to end violence against women nationally, regionally and globally?



Yes and no. Anything that exists can be measured, it is just a matter of finding the right measurement tool. That said, there is so much multilayered impact to the work that we do, it is unreasonable to expect that all of it would be captured in a measurement effort. There is also the issue of variables...isolating variables for study when looking at violence against women is very difficult, because there are so many factors at play every situation, at multiple layers of the social ecology.


-What methods has your organization or network developed to help measure
the impact of your work to end violence against women?



Our organization uses a computer database to monitor the progress of funded programs in achieving performance objectives. To a certain extent the individual programs are able to define how they will measure the success of their programs. Most use some type of pre- and post- test comparison. Unfortunately, due to lack of resources there is very little formal outcome evaluation in our state.


-What are some of the challenges you encounter in evaluating your work?



Lack of resources. Formal evaluation takes time, money and training and it just isn't top on the priority list for programs struggling to keep their doors open. In addition, the receptivity to the notion of evaluation varies among staff and programs...some individuals really do not see the value in evaluating their programs.


-What resources are needed to make evaluation more efficient? Who are
the sources of these resources? (e.g other human rights groups, states,
donors, regional bodies)



More federal, state, public and private funds are needed to support evaluation efforts. In addition, partnerships between universities and providers must continued to be cultivated through the use of interns and resource dollars. Loan forgiveness and other incentives are needed to encourage individuals to enter helping and advocacy professions. These professions need to pay better and organizations need to be more stable to promote employee retention. Self-care as a tenet needs to be present in organizational cultures to prevent burnout. All of these efforts will support an environment more conducive to better evaluation.


- Do you feel that the movement to end violence against women can be
strengthened by dedicating more time to evaluating our own progress?



Aboslutely. If we do not evaluate our progress, how do we know where we are? What is working? It is also difficult to advocate for more funds on a feeling- we need to show results, and in areas where we can't show results, we need to use that to get more investment in demonstration projects and additional research.


- What role can we play to support each other in evaluating the impact
of our work to end violence against women?

 

Sharing evaluation tools and methods is really helpful for the spread of ideas and to build support for program evaluation.

 

Amanda Stevens

Ohio Department of Health

USA


________________________________

From: 16days_discussion-bounces at email.rutgers.edu on behalf of Sadia Hameed
Sent: Mon 11/19/2007 2:24 PM
To: 16days_discussion at email.rutgers.edu
Subject: [16days_discussion] 16 Days COUNTDOWN- issue 4



16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence- November 25-December 10, 2007

"DEMANDING IMPLEMENTATION-CHALLENGING OBSTACLES: END VIOLENCE AGAINST
WOMEN"

Dear Friends,

Today we kick off discussion around the fourth thinking point within
this year's 16 Days of Activism Theme

**Thinking point 4: Evaluating the Impact and effectiveness of work to
prevent violence against women- identifying the successes and the gaps**

In order to help facilitate the next few days of discussion on this
issue I am sending for your consideration the following points:

- Do you think that it is possible to measure the impact of the work
done to end violence against women nationally, regionally and globally?

-What methods has your organization or network developed to help measure
the impact of your work to end violence against women?

-What are some of the challenges you encounter in evaluating your work?

-What resources are needed to make evaluation more efficient? Who are
the sources of these resources? (e.g other human rights groups, states,
donors, regional bodies)

- Do you feel that the movement to end violence against women can be
strengthened by dedicating more time to evaluating our own progress?

- What role can we play to support each other in evaluating the impact
of our work to end violence against women?

I look forward to a dynamic and interactive discussion from you all over
the next few days!

Please remember that you must reply to the *listserve* in order to post
your message to everyone- and not just to me.

Please include the following information in your responses: _Your name
or organization's name and the country you are based in._

*If I could also call upon our multi-lingual colleagues to assist us in
this conversation and provide translations for submissions is languages
other than English that would be greatly appreciated! *

Kind Regards,

Sadia Hameed
Program Coordinator
CWGL
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